English pudding

Cooking with: English pudding

Two Stuart sweet puddings in skins – rice puddings and ambergris puddings
These ‘sausages’ browning on a seventeenth century gridiron, are in fact two different sweet puddings from the reigns of James I and his son Charles I. The large ring on the left is a Rice Pudding, made from a recipe in Gervase Markham’s The English Huswife (London: 1615). The three smaller ones on the right areLord Conway’s Ambergris Puddings from The Queen’s Closet Newly Opened (London: 1655). Both recipes are given below.With its rich blend of rice, cream, pepper and dates, Markham’s rice pudding is excellent, especially when lightly toasted over the embers. It would probably appeal to most modern palletes. On the other hand, the ambergris pudding is much more unusual, as it is flavoured with a blend of ambergris, musk and orange-flower water. When toasted or lightly fried, it look remarkably like a sausage, but has a sweet, perfumed taste. According to W.M., the compiler ofThe Queen’s Closet, the recipe was given to Lord Conway by an Italian ‘for a great rarity’. Sir Edward Viscount Conway of Ragley (1564-1630) was Principal Secretary of State to Charles I. His recipe is typical of late mannerist cookery at its most artificial. It is interesting to note how these puddings found favour with the ladies at court, as both musk and ambergris were considered to be powerful aphrodisiacs at this time.

THE LORD CONWAY HIS LORDSHIPS RECEIPT FOR THE MAKING OF AMBER PUDDINGS

FIRST TAKE THE GUTS OF A YOUNG HOG, AND WASH THEM VERY CLEAN, AND THEN TAKE TWO POUND OF THE BEST HOGS FAT, AND A POUND AND A HALFE OF THE BEST JORDAN ALMONDS THE WHICH BEING BLANCHT, TAKE ONE HALF OF THEM, & BEAT THEM VERY SMALL, AND THE OTHER HALFE RESERVE WHOLE UNBEATEN THEN TAKE A POUND AND A HALFE OF FINE SUGAR AND FOUR WHITE LOAVES, AND GRATE THE LOAVES OVER THE FORMER COMPOSITION AND MINGLE THEM WELL TOGETHER IN A BASON HAVING SO DONE, PUT TO IT HALFE AN OUNCE OF AMBERGREECE THE WHICH MUST BE SCRAPT VERY SMALL OVER THE SAID COMPOSITION TAKE HALFE A QUARTER OF AN OUNCE OF LEVANT MUSK AND BRUISE IT IN A MARBLE MORTER, WITH A QUARTER OF A PINT OF ORANGE FLOWER WATER THEN MINGLE THESE ALL VERY WELL TOGETHER, AND HAVING SO DONE, FILL THE SAID GUTS THER­WITH, THIS RECEIPT WAS GIVEN HIS LORDSHIP BY AN ITALIAN FOR A GREAT RARIETY, AND HAS BEEN FOUND SO TO BE BY THOSE LADIES OF HONOUR TO WHOM HIS LORDSHIP HAS IMPARTED THE SAID RECEPTION.

FROM: W.M., THE QUEEN’S CLOSET OPENED (LONDON: 1655)

Ambergris was a popular ingredient in both confectionery and cookery in the Stuart period. Though it smells of very little in its raw state, it releases a violet-like odour when blended with other ingredients like musk and perfumed waters. In addition to ambergris puddings, some early cookery texts have recipes for ambergris cakes. Lord Conway’s pudding tastes like an orange-flower scented marchpane and is actually suprisingly delicate

To make her puddings, the young woman on the left is filling her ‘farmes’ or ‘forms’ (cleansed hog’s guts) with a small funnel identical to that above left. This laborious method is what Gervase Markham refers to in one of his recipes, when he instructs his readers to ‘fill it up in the farmes according to the order of good Housewifery’. Later kitchenmaids and housewives could take advantage of the much more convenient sausage forcer on the right.

A marrow pudding garnished with slices of Gervase Markham’s rice pudding and Lord Conway’s amber pudding. This particular marrow pudding, from a 1723 recipe, is flavoured with rose water and is therefore more practical for the modern cook than the ambergris flavoured puddings of Charles I’s ladies of honour.

MARROW PUDDINGS

CUT TWO FRENCH ROLLS INTO SLICES, AND TAKE A QUARTER OF A POUND OF COARSE BISKET, PUT INTO A SAUCEPAN A QUART OF MILK, SET IT OVER THE FIRE, MAKE IT B1OOD WARM, AND POUR IT UPON YOUR BREAD; COVER IT CLOSE AND LET IT SOAK, ‘TILL IT IS COLD; RUB IT THROUGH A CULLENDER, MINCE HALF A POUND OF MARROW, AND PUT TO IT THREE EGGS WELL BEATEN AND STRAINED; THEN MIX ALL TOGETHER; SWEETEN WITH SUGAR; ADD A LITTLE SALT, AND A SPOONFUL OR TWO OF ROSE-WATER, SCRAPE IN A LITTLE NUTMEG, PUT IN TWO OUNCES OF ALMONDS WELL POWNDED; MIX ALL THESE WELL TOGETHER, PUT THEM INTO GUTS, AND TIE THEM UP; BUT DO NOT FILL THEM TOO FULL: BOIL THEM IN WATER FOR A QUARTER OF AN HOUR, TURNING THEM WITH A SKIMMER; LAY THEM IN A CULLENDER TO COOL: WHEN YOU USE THEM, PUT THEM INTO A PAN WITH A LITTLE BUTTER, AND FRY THEM AS YELLOW AS GOLD, OR YOU MAY SET THEM IN THE MOUTH OF AN OVEN. THESE ARE PROPER TO GARNISH A BOIL’D PUDDING, OR FRICASSY OF CHICKENS, FOR THE FIRST COURSE, OR YOU MAY SERVE THEM IN LITTLE DISHES OR PLATES FOR THE SECOND COURSE.

FROM: JOHN NOTT, THE COOKS AND CONFECTIONERS DICTIONARY(LONDON: 1723)

 

— article from: historicfood.com — all rights and credits to them —

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